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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
by some demonstration, protesting the mohammed video, getting out of control. a lot of people in congress have said the mohammed video story was a cover-up. i actually hope for the good of the country that is true because at least it would demonstrate that the president understood reality. he was trying to sweep it aside. i'm worried that the ideology that controls the white house and presumably the state department which we're going to see four more years of, leaves us dangerously unprepared to meet the threats that we see from al qaeda, from other terrorist groups in the middle east and around the world. gregg: what do you think john kerry brings to the table? >> well, he certainly has a lot of experience, although a lot of it has been badly, bad judgment in a range of issues. he has been soft on the iranian nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on the north korean nuclear weapons program. he has been soft on russian desires to recreate russian hogeminy in the former soviet union. he has been soft on china's territorial demand in the south china sea. i could go on. i think he will f
and holland and company. and tomorrow tonight, we'll have more analysis on the fed decision. mohamed el-erian joins us. he's the c.e.o. of pimco. >> tom: still head, british bank hsbc agrees to pay a record fine for laundering mexico drug money. >> susie: it's a major hit to organized labor-- michigan approved legislation today that would greatly limit labor rights. protestors swarmed the state capital as lawmakers passed a bill prohibiting unions from requiring employees to join and pay dues. the move would make michigan, one of the most union-friendly states, the 24th "right to work" state, where union dues are voluntary. >> tom: more bumpy skies for boeing's 787 dreamliner. boeing's much anticipated and high-profile plane was grounded last week, according to "the new york times." the federal aviation administration also has ordered that fuel line connectors on all 787s be inspected. analysts call these problems minor hiccups. but as sylvia hall reports, the dreamliner's profitability to boeing right now is raising bigger concerns. >> reporter: boeing's 787 dreamliner promises to use
the prophet mohamed. >> we've heard calls for ambassador rice to resign. are you in favor of that? >> no. that's shooting the messenger. she was told to go out and do that. i blame the secretary of state, i blame the operatives in the white house and i blame our national security adviser. if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> cia director david petraeus steps down after admitting to cheating on his wife. tonight new information on his stunning resignation and the latest developments. >> there is a theory that, look, come on, we had great generals, mcarthur, patton, eisenhower, j.f.k., clinton, they all had affairs. what do you say to that? >> well, i don't think the idea -- the problem is that general petraeus had an affair. i think the idea and the big problem is that he was director of the cia and he walked into right into one of the most blackmailable situations you can have. it's good the u.s. found out about it before the russians or chinese. it's not that he's a general messing around, and according to the code of the justice that's not allow
that's backed by islamists and president mohammed morsi. supporters of morsi and protesters threw rocks at each other, and riot police intervened with tear gas. officials said at least 40 people were injured. it was unclear who started the fight. north korea has detained an american citizen, and says he confessed to unspecified crimes. he was identified today as kenneth bae, a korean-american tour operator from washington state. north korean state media said he entered the country, with a tour, on november 3. the north has detained five other americans since 2009. all were released, eventually. american leaders past and present paid tribute today to the late senator daniel inouye of hawaii. a crowd filled the national cathedral in washington for the service honoring the japanese- american who became a war hero and served in the senate more than 50 years. president obama recalled watching inouye during the televised watergate hearings in 1973. >> to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person who was not a central cast. and the way he commanded the respect of an entire
. >> as mohamed el-erian said, it's the new normal. nothing is going to happen next year in all probability. there will be the italian electrics. if berlusconi starts to poll better in a run up to the italian elections, which i think will happen, then you're likely to see bonds markets reacting a little bit to that. that could cause problems in the spanish and italian yield curve. so maybe that would that will trigger mariano rajoy asking for a bailout. anything which happens on the policy front, anything which happens in the next few months is going to be weighed for its impact on the election prospects come next september. >> you're lucky because we have a whole lot more europe after the break. we can continue to talk about all things european. but of all of this talk about the cliff, if it hasn't sent you over the edge yet, head on to our website and take the cliff quiz. see if you can match the right quiz with a number of things in. >> you can also take a look at what's on the agenda today in the u.s. a couple of economic reports wrap up the week. both due out at 10:00 a.m. eastern. the
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
on a new hard-line constitution favored by islamist president mohammed morsi. early exit polls suggest about 60% of egyptians are in favor, and that has the country's muslim brotherhood party already declaring victory. amy kellogg is live from london. she's been following it from there. amy, why are these preliminary results so controversial? >> reporter: well, they are controversial, gregg, because the opposition, and that would be largely the secular groups, the liberals, and the christians say they they did not have a fair stake in the body that drew up this constitution. there have already been allegations of voter fraud in this process and frankly only a third of egypt's eligible voters turned out. if this constitution does pass there are people who say it doesn't have a whole lot of legitimacy. the judges are looking into these claims of irregularities, and that may be why we don't have the results of a process that began over a week ago. this is an important moment because this new document is really meant to inch vine all inshrine everything to the citizens that the old one did
assad, his country's military police chief just switched sides and joined the rebels. mohammed is monitoring the situation from lebanon and joins us live. >> reporter: joe, the day began with news that major general, chief of military place in syria, had defected, had decided to join as he called it the people's uprising. he posted a video in which he stated his reasons for why he was defectsing, one of which was that the syrian military had betrayed the ideal as of syria and gone after the syrian people. now, we heard from rebel-free syrian army members throughout the day that in fact the fsa had helped transport the major general across country lines from syria into turkey. they say is he safe, that is he in turkey. they've also said they're willing to help other military officials in syria defect, but that they wouldn't be willing to help for much longer. the rebels feel they are the upper hand. they're saying that it's only a small window of time, they're giving other military officials in syria to defect, otherwise they won't look kindly upon their actions. the rebels beli
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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